162016May
Narrative Variability as an Antidote to Repetition

Narrative Variability as an Antidote to Repetition

Variability in nature is increasingly being understood from the point of view of complexity theory and nonlinear science.  Heart rate variability, for example, has gotten a lot of attention as an important indicator of physical and mental health.  Extremes at either end – excessive variability and insufficient variability – are associated with poor outcomes. How…

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112015Aug

National Institute of Health Collaborates with Major Women’s Organizations To Target Post-Partum Depression

A new video  about postpartum depression marks the launch of a mental health education collaboration by two NIH Institutes and one of the nation’s largest African-American women’s organizations. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) have partnered with Delta Sigma Theta…

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12015Aug

Irrelationship: How We Use Dysfunctional Relationships to Hide from Intimacy

Irrelationship: How We Use Dysfunctional Relationships to Hide from Intimacy is a transformative exploration of the unconscious defense systems created by couples (and others) to avoid the vulnerability that comes with investment in others. Drawing from their extensive clinical experience, the authors explain the development of brainlock and irrelationship using the histories of numerous individuals…

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122015May

Depression Can Change Your DNA: Study

Depression may drastically change your emotional climate, and there may seem to be no end in sight. A new study shows that depression could also affect you in a very physical way, on an intimately cellular level. Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics created a study that arrived at this conclusion. This finding…

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122015May

Targeting depression with deep brain stimulation

The darkest day of Marjorie Stowe’s depression came when her long-time psychiatrist told her she obviously was choosing to resist the healing effects of one medication after another, psychotherapy, electric shock. “You must be getting some emotional payoff that prevents you from letting your depression go,” he said. “Secretly, you must enjoy being this way.”…

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122015May

‘Big question’ in neuroscience may be answered after GPS-like brain mapping

It sounds surreal but scientists have mapped the circuitry of the brain. It’s similar to how the Global Positioning System (GPS) tracks your location on the planet. The breakthrough could help understand how data is processed in the nervous system. Neuroscientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Harvard University have announced their “Neuronal Positioning…

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112015May

The Checkup: High Anxiety

Slate and WBUR’s health podcast examines the fear of flying, parental anxiety, and managing your relentless worrying. By Carey Goldberg and Rachel Zimmerman A plane takes off at Charles de Gaulle Airport near Paris in 2012.Photo by Alexander Klein /AFP/Getty Images Listen to Episode 11 of WBUR’s The Checkup, “High Anxiety” Subscribe in iTunes ∙…

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112015May

Borderline personality disorder as debilitating as bipolar disorder

The deterioration of psychiatric and physical health caused by borderline personality disorder (BPD) rivals that of bipolar disorder, according to Mark Zimmerman, M.D., a researcher at Rhode Island Hospital. His research was published online in the British Journal of Psychiatry today. “The level of psychosocial morbidity and suicidality associated with BPD is as great, or…

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112015May

New insight into how brain makes memories

Fluorescent microphotograph of neurons that shows filapodia extending out from dendrite. Credit: Webb Lab / Vanderbilt Every time you make a memory, somewhere in your brain a tiny filament reaches out from one neuron and forms an electrochemical connection to a neighboring neuron. A team of biologists at Vanderbilt University, headed by Associate Professor of…

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